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Chicken Pox is Not Dangerous or Scary

admin June 9, 2016

Chicken Pox is Not Dangerous or Scary

On social media right now (and in some of the mainstream media), a woman’s photos are making the rounds.  The woman is Kayley Burke, and she’s shared pictures of her infant son, with a rare and serious reaction to chicken pox.  He’s now been hospitalized with a secondary infection.

Kayley blames “anti-vaxxers.”  In fact, she specifically says, “…if you don’t vaccinate your kids your a bloody idiot.”

Here is Kayley’s post:

Kaley Burke screenshot

Chicken Pox is Not Dangerous or Scary

I am sorry that Kayley and her son are going through this.  No one wants to see their babies sick or suffering.  I understand she is feeling poorly (also having the chicken pox herself), stressed out, and upset.

I also know that the mainstream media is going to pounce on this, and call out “anti-vaxxers” and tell them it’s their fault and that they need to know what chicken pox “really” looks like.

This is incredibly irresponsible, and the media, not being personally involved, has no excuse for it.  But, scary stories make headlines, so they’re going to use what they can to get the clicks and stir up some anger.

Parents deserve better than this.  So, we’re going to take a much closer look at chicken pox, and Kayley’s story.

Kayley’s Story

Going off the Facebook post, there’s not a lot we can say for sure.  But it does say “…Kaliah hasn’t long been immunised….”

How recently, exactly, was the little girl vaccinated?  She has chicken pox, too.  Either she was vaccinated months or years ago (I don’t know how old she is) and her vaccine didn’t really work…or she was vaccinated within the last few weeks, and is having an adverse reaction to the vaccine, in the form of atypical chicken pox.  If the latter is the case, then she most likely passed chicken pox to her brother.

This study shows that chicken pox that occurs 15 – 42 days post-vaccination is often due to the shot, and that it has been passed to others as a result.

As for the mother…I don’t know how old she is, either.  She’s probably under 30, which means that she was probably vaccinated for chicken pox as a little girl (the vaccine came out in 1995).  It’s unlikely that she had chicken pox naturally, or she wouldn’t have it now.  So either she never got it and was never vaccinated…or she was vaccinated, and her vaccine wore off/didn’t work.

It’s possible that all of this is due to vaccines working poorly…or not at all.  But we don’t know.  We can’t for sure blame vaccines…and we can’t for sure blame “anti-vaxxers,” either.

This is really important, because a lot of people are going to share this, with the very limited information we have, and jump to some serious conclusions about vaccines and people who avoid them.  Don’t do that.  There’s nothing in this story that “proves” anything.

Chicken Pox Complications

What about Kayley’s poor boy?

It’s obviously horrible that he’s experiencing complications.  No parent wants to see their child go through that.

However, his reaction is really quite rare.

My own children have all had chicken pox.  They were nearly 8 (oldest) to 5 months (youngest) when they had it.  Not a single kid ever had a reaction like that, or any complications at all.  This is just not something that is “typical” with chicken pox.

This study shows a rate of severe complications of less than 1 in 100,000.  The rate for skin infections, specifically, was about 1 in 500,000.  This study shows similar rates.  (The second study also shows that 5 children died of varicella, an incidence rate of about 1 in 2 million, and that 4 out of 5 of those children had pre-existing conditions.  In other words, it next to impossible to die of varicella if you are healthy.)

This study claims a varicella death rate of approximately 5 in 10,000,000 (or 1 in 2 million) prior to the vaccine’s licensure, which is consistent with other studies.

Why did he have a reaction like that?

As it turns out, the use of ibuprofen is associated with a sharply increased risk of severe skin reactions like this (at least doubled, possibly tripled).  This study explains it.  We don’t know if the mom used this, or not, but it is commonly recommended that parents alternate acetaminophen and ibuprofen for fever — so it’s possible.

Check out this story — the little boy looks like he’s had a similar reaction, and in that case, it was confirmed to be due to ibuprofen use.

Basically, this kind of skin reaction is super rare, but the chances are increased if you use OTC medication.  Most mainstream parents do, so she probably did — obviously intending to help.  I’m sure she didn’t know.

The Varicella Vaccine

The varicella vaccine itself isn’t super effective (source).  It drops below 80% within 10 years of having been given (possibly why the mom got chicken pox).  Plus, routine varicella vaccination, due to protection waning early, has led to a proportional increase in shingles cases, so it’s a net wash.

Additionally, this study shows that the rate of severe complications to the varicella vaccine is 2.6 per 100,000 doses; which, while rare, is far higher than the rate of severe complications from the disease itself.  A child who receives 2 doses has roughly a 5 in 100,000 chance of a severe reaction to the vaccines, vs. fewer than 1 in 100,000 chance of severe reaction to varicella.

The varicella vaccine is approximately 6 times more dangerous than actual varicella infection.

At any rate.  The vaccine doesn’t work all that well, can cause atypical varicella, can cause secondary varicella in family members, and is more dangerous than varicella itself.

It’s important to remember that ibuprofen should not be used to treat pain or fever with varicella.  As noted above, it increases the risk of complications.

The best course of action is the old-fashioned baking soda or oatmeal baths, plenty of anti-itch lotion (we used a salve made of calendula, chamomile, and lavender), herbal tea (try lemon balm) and lots of rest.  It’ll run its course in 5 – 10 days.

I do feel bad for this mother.  She got some poor medical advice, and now her baby is suffering.  I hope that he, and she, feel better very soon.

Do you think chicken pox is not dangerous, or does it worry you?

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83 Comments

  1. I had chicken pox as an adult, many many years ago. I had it a year or two before the vaccine came out. I know I had graduated from college, but am unsure of my actual age (but I would have been in my twenties when I contracted it). It was truly HORRIBLE to have it as an adult. My doctor explained that our bodies are not designed to fight the virus off as an adult. It affects adults more severely. I missed work and church for weeks, and even when I was declared “no longer contagious” I was weak, tired easily and was dizzy a lot. One of my friends’ moms actually knew a lady that died from the chicken pox. She contracted it from one of her kids, and did not rest or see a doctor, and she died from the disease. Just because you or your kids might not have a severe case, does not mean others cannot.

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  2. Great post. Excellent that you included plenty of sources for the info.

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  3. There was a time, not so very long ago that the life expectancy in the US was south of 50. Not because the average person didn’t live past 50, but because SO MANY children did not live to adulthood. The only thing separating you from that reality are those of us that vaccinate our children.

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  4. Get used to this. Since moms aren’t getting the chicken pox naturally, they’re not passing on their natural antibodies to their babies, and more and more babies are going to get sick with a disease that they used to be (when all children got the disease between the ages of 4 and 12) protected from.

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  5. My son, now 41, had a terrible case of chicken pox when he was 8-10 years old. Our physician visited our home several times because he was so concerned. Our son had pox on his eyeballs, under his fingernails and toenails and around his heart. He had thousands of the bumps which itched and which made him quite ill, not just uncomfortable. I don’t know how he got the infection since he was immunized years before but it makes no difference. Someone somewhere had to have spread the disease.Perhaps the vaccine was defective. Who knows. It is a travesty to say this isn’t a dangerous or painful disease. No child should have to go through what my child and the little boy in the article had to go through.

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  6. The mum admitted to using Nurofen (ibuofrin) for the baby on Facebook. Her doctor prescribed it and she didn’t question it or look into it. How typical. Don’t hold your breath waiting for an apology.

    So this story is making the rounds, placing all the blame on the unvaccinated, and it’s completely unwarranted.

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  7. Well balanced, responsible article. Shows how information presented can differ so much when one source seeks to present the Truth for everyone’s benefit(this article), and other sources (MSM) seek to promote fear and of course generate $$$, for the benefit of a very few.

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  8. Excellent post with appropriate links.

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  9. Thanks for your post. You share information – they share fear.
    Vaccines indeed are fancy inventions: They create problems which can be used to sell more vaccines…

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  10. By the looks of the infant I really hope this mother hasn’t unknowingly given him ibuprofen for his temps because this is a big no no and can cause those sort of reactions. Some Drs still recommend it. I’m not anti-vacs and I do not think the vaccine had anything to do with this. I just feel sorry for the poor child who has had a rare reaction to a preventable disease.

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  11. Fantastic post. Thankyou!

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  12. She admitted to giving ibuprofen and said she would continue too since the Dr recommended it

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  13. Thanks so much for this info!!

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  14. You have made no mention of the long term effects of this disease,Are you aware of shingles and its debilitating effect or is that an inconvenient truth?

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  15. Yes I do. For the reason we all used to attend chicken pox parties to be exposed to it and avoid getting it as adults.

    Chickenpox generally isn’t scary but either is the flu until you or your child is the one in however many statistics to get a serious reaction or fatality.

    Chicken pox isn’t mumps or meningitis I’ll give you that and the skin infection thing is a definite wow but if you could spare your child getting c.pox wouldn’t you? I remember having it and it was horrible.

    But difference of opinion and you have made a well thought out argument.

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  16. According to her FB page, this mother did use ibuprofen. And several people told her on her page that it might be making the chickenpox worse. But her doctor had told her to use it for the fever, so she kept on using it. 🙁

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  17. Very well put together and informative. When I was a child, it was just part of childhood. My mother really wanted me to just go ahead and get it all over with……mumps, measles, and chickenpox. Had them all, as was expected, and did just fine.

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  18. Where are the sources for this article?

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  19. I think people have just gotten so paranoid of everything today! Because they are told by Doctors, pharmacists, drug manufacturers,…..that they need this new frickin vaccine! Of course they are convincing people to do this! They get money! The chickenpox vaccine didnt come out until 1995!! Before that it wasnt a big deal to get chickenpox!! Once you had them you dont get them again! Some people would intentionally bring their kids to visit someone with chickenpox just so they would get it over with! Measles, mumps??? We lived through them!! People need to use their own brains and stop believing everything they hear!

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  20. 4 of my five children had chicken pox with one having a severe allergic reaction where she couldn’t breathe three people in our region died from it the year before. This virus affects internal as well as external organs. Only my 5th child was vaccinated as it was not available for the other 4. I was also breastfeeding my daughter when she got the virus. It is not a simple disease and until you have experienced a complication and had a child crying that they can’t breathe you have no right to tell people that this is not a dangerous disease. As a researcher 3 papers mean nothing as I’m sure there are equally as many or lots more that wouldn’t support your so called evidence. Wake up and start considering the truth as well as other people’s rights to live without this disease.

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  21. I remember having chicken pox. I don’t remember what it was like, but I do know I wanted to scratch but was told not to. And bumps. I’ve had worse and longer reactions to creams put on my legs after a pedicure. Or poison ivy. Ick.

    My kids were vaccinated. I wish they weren’t. I didn’t think it through as I should have. I’d rather they get their immunity naturally. My third child had ill effects from each vaccination, and my fourth has not been vaccinated. Nope… she’s 16 months and I’m still nursing. Best way to get her the immunity she needs, in my opinion

    I think, as parents, we need to question and research the status quo before plunging into it ourselves for the sake of our children.

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  22. I have a 13 and 11 year old both have only had one injection for chicken pox and I never went back for the second. Now I have one toddler (not vaccinated) and another on the way. Should I worry about the older kids getting chicken pox and their cases being worse than the littles?

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  23. Chicken pox are awful!! I can remember every miserable minute for 2 long weeks of scratching, and living in a oatmeal bath! It was the worst illness I have had 2ND only to my cancer treatment! My brother had pox maybe worse then I did! He had sores on his scalp, in his ears they were everywhere! Why would anyone want to put their kids through such a horrible experience?

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  24. Yes I do, we nearly lost our precious granddaughter at 6 months of age due to chicken pox, she was in hospital for 8 days hooked up to 3 drips and ged through her nose. In the UK we don’t get a vaccine for it either so we don’t get a choice!

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  25. I agree that in general chicken pox is not necessarily dangerous and can usually run it’s course in a healthy child without the severe complications seen by this young infant. However, as a clinician, I feel the need to point out that your sources do NOT make the claims you are touting in this article and I would encourage parents to read the articles you quoted to come to their own conclusions. For example, the varicella vaccine is effective and even the article you quoted discussed the improvements in cases from 2800 down to only 800 once vaccines were provided and the ineffective level was noted as 20% and that is why they encouraged a booster shot (to improve effectiveness which dropped after several years). The article you referenced to compare severe complications in vaccinated versus non-vaccinated has NO data of non-vaccinated patients so they CANNOT and DO NOT state the significance of complications among vaccinated versus non-vaccinated. They are only discussing complications reported by vaccinated patients because that is the population they studied. Therefore your conclusion that vaccinated patients had 6 times more complications is not scientific and it is not proven in any study you stated. Please check references and follow well re-searched medical advice when caring for your own children because it can effect other peoples children too.

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  26. she did give ibruprofen and is continuing to do so, according to herself, posting on the 7news site which she then removed but was screen shot and shown by others.

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  27. People who write articles this this are a cancer on society. i genuinely hope you are afflicted with it so you can find out how effective your oatmeal tincture is.

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  28. Great info and I agree .i had chicken pox as a child as did my brother and sister and Although it isn’t fun it is not a major deal and we were all fine 🙂 I’ve been exposed to it since and never had it again .i hope my unvaccinated son will get it before he is an adult as I hear it is best as a child rather than when you are an adult .i hope the mum and baby in this story have a quick recovery.i think it is a sad story on lots of levels but mainly that he most list co grafted it from his sisters shedding !!

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  29. Not to start anything, but they are from the UK where the vaccine isn’t readily available and certainly wasn’t offered to the mother as a child. Just so you have all the facts about that!

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  30. Great article. Is the photo of one of your children? Is that what typical chicken pox looks like?

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  31. All of my family members (myself included) got chicken pox as children and it’s not something that I am concerned about, no. I was old enough to remember the whole experience. Great article, properly cited. Well done.

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  32. Finally someone with common sense. Brilliant post.

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  33. Excellent post. We don’t know what happened, but it’s clear that there is a plausible link between the sister’s vaccination and the poor baby getting sick. It would be great if the mother could clarify this, and whether or not she gave the baby ibuprofen, instead of fearmongering.

    All 5 of my siblings and I had chicken pox – no complications.

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  34. “This is incredibly irresponsible, and the media, not being personally involved, has no excuse for it. But, scary stories make headlines, so they’re going to use what they can to get the clicks and stir up some anger.”

    Your statement is contradictory to your post. After all, aren’t you part of the media?

    I’ve been a nurse for over 20 years and YES chicken pox can and is scary and dangerous for certain populations such as infants, elderly and the medically fragile. Educate yourself.

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  35. There is a screen shot of the mother commenting that she unregretably gave her son infant nurofen (ibuprofen) when his fever was “in the high 38’s” (which is not actually high… still below 102F) during the early days of this chicken pox virus.
    You can find this screen shot on the FB group “know the vax” I their recent photos.

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  36. From the CDC:

    Chickenpox (varicella) used to be very common in the United States before the chickenpox vaccine became available in 1995. In the early 1990s, an average of 4 million people got chickenpox, 10,500 to 13,000 were hospitalized (range, 8,000 to 18,000), and 100 to 150 died each year. Most of the severe complications and deaths from chickenpox occurred in people who were previously healthy. Each year, more than 3.5 million cases of varicella, 9,000 hospitalizations, and 100 deaths are prevented by varicella vaccination in the United States.

    From the WHO:

    http://www.who.int/immunization/sage/meetings/2014/april/2_SAGE_April_VZV_Seward_Varicella.pdf

    Varicella IS most certainly a dangerous disease. Simply because deaths from that disease have been declining in recent years due to available immunizations does make it any less so.

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  37. I just have a couple of observations:

    One: You realize that vaccinations are not about your child, right? There are people (and children) who rely on herd immunity because they are either too young for the vaccine, immunosuppressed, etc.

    Two: The source of the above quotes are from the NCBI. The following is a direct from the NCBI regarding childhood vaccinations: “There is evidence that some vaccines are associated with serious adverse events; however, these events are extremely rare and must be weighed against the protective benefits that vaccines provide.”

    So, if one should NOT give a vaccine based on a low statistical significant of adverse reactions than should one GIVE vaccines based on the same on the same theory of low number of adverse reactions??

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  38. Thank you for this info; our family doctor recommended that my children be exposed to Chicken pox naturally – which worked for my now 34 year old daughter but not with my now 21 year old son because everyone had been vaccinated! We could not find natural chicken pox. I never knew anyone to be deathly ill from chicken pox (I am in my 66th year now) and believe it builds stronger immune systems. Love all your facts – SCIENCE! It works to hold firm when being attacked by angry pro-vaccine zealots.

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  39. I have 7 kids. The oldest 6 all got chicken pox, several of them more than once and none had infections or complications.Obviously it isn’t much fun, but uncomfortable not dangerous. Infections are possible from scratching and one isn’t supposed to be out in the sun a lot with the break out. The mom said the older sibling had recently been vaccinated and had a minor break out, so it sounds like they all contracted it from the vaccination itself. There is a great herb called Pau d’arco that can be used for viral,bacterial and fungal infections, so we tried it when my 6th child got chicken pox right before we were going to be on a trip to see grandparents. It dried the pox up in 3 days. So, we never worry about illness, have a few herbs on hand and I have kids that never required even antibiotics more than once or twice in their entire childhood. They rarely even caught a cold – and I ran a home daycare for many years.

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  40. When I was a kid (I am 70 now) it was common for us to get the chickenpox. Yes, it was itchy and I had big blisters that were in my scalp and everywhere. Uncomfortable but part of childhood. Moms stayed home with their kids & did not complain. My 3 grown kids got it and it was the same. Now today I talked to a pediatrician friend who said 2 of her kids just got over the chickenpox and they had the shot! This is so stupid. Does not make sense. Our granddaughter is now 6 and we are hoping she can catch it as shots are out of the question!

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  41. There is also another possibility for the secondary infection. Scratching. A child that age can not be told not to scratch. IMO mittens or socks should be placed upon the child’s hands. Hands and finger nails are very dirty even in adults. I have 3 siblings and we all contracted chickenpox as adults. The vaccine had not yet existed and we all had a typical case. My son was born with severe eczema. I would notice blood on his sheets and applied socks to his hands at night ( I could control his scratching during the day) but he also ended up with a secondary infection. He was treated and the socks remained on his hands until he could control his scratching(years later). He still suffers from eczema but has never had an additional secondary infection. He is 27yo. So please keep children’s hands away from any kind of skin disorder.

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  42. Oh rubbish – it certainly can be dangerous and scary. My 11 year old was not vaccinated against chickenpox (it’s not on the schedule here) and she was so sick with chickenpox I was beside myself. She did not have ibuprofen and I nursed her totally appropriately. She got a secondary infection and was so very sick. I was so grateful for the emergency services and what may have been life-saving antibiotics. She was extremely healthy prior to the disease, and she still has pock marks on her face and body a year and a half later. Just because you’ve had it and it was ok (as it was with my 7 year old), doesn’t mean that it can’t be an extremely nasty disease. If I had my time again, I would vaccinate her in a heart-beat.

    I checked out one of the studies you linked above and don’t think it proves your point about it not being dangers or scary AT ALL:
    Out of the 119 that were hospitalised and met the criteria for serious complications in previously health kids: “The most frequent complications were neurologic, which were reported in 73 children (61.3%); cerebellitis was the leading diagnosis (n = 48), followed by encephalitis (n = 22), meningitis (n = 2), and central facial palsy (n = 1). A total of 46 (38.6%) infectious complications were identified. Superinfections of the skin were present in 31 (26.0%), pyogenic arthritis was present in 5 (4.2%), osteomyelitis was present in 4 (3.3%), necrotizing fasciitis was present in 3 (2.5%), orbital cellulitis was present in 2 (1.6%), and pneumonia was present in 1 (0.8%)”.

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  43. You do not know the advice the mother received from a doctor so you can’t judge on the advice firstly secondly you don’t know if this 8 month old baby is healthy or not so again you can’t judge on the advice she was giving you also have no idea of moms medical history which can explain why she had gotten chicken poxs she could of had heart surgery or any other surgery in the past 8 months which can cause immune problems she could also have developed an immune disorder so you really don’t know also yes the chicken pox is scary when you or your child have health issues because you could develop other complication

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  44. The family is in the UK where the vaccine is not part of the childhood schedule – you have to pay for it privately which you don’t for other vaccines. The mother is unlikely to have had one as a child as it is the knowledge that it is available is only recent also. The majority of the U.K. population have not been vaccinated. Don’t know why she is calling out anti vaxers as most people are either unaware or can’t afford it. Thankfully my 3 have had it.

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  45. I have one thought to point out here. It is possible to contract chicken pox as a child and get them again as an adult. I have a few friends in their 50s who have now had shingles who had the chicken pox as children. The way we protect ourselves is by repeated exposure. Back when I was a kid we invited friends over to share the disease. And you got repeated exposure by people who had it at school etc. this protected both the adults and the children. Now we vaccinate for chicken pox when children are young which prevents that exposure that we repeatedly got and makes us susceptible to shingles as adults. We are also seeing more cases of college students with shingles and thus the more of this we see, the more pharma can push that we get these vaccines.

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  46. Clearly the baby that is sick is too young to receive the varicella vaccine (given no earlier than 12 months). Young infants, children with immune deficiencies and children with eczema can DIE from chickenpox.

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  47. If the mother had real herd immunity, like those of us in our late 30’s and above, and if she were breastfeeding her child, this probably wouldn’t have even happen even if the older child had the vaccine.

    Infants are not ready to develop their own immunity, and that’s why breastmilk is LOADED with the mother’s immunity.

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  48. How can you say that chickenpox is not dangerous or scary when there are cases of it killing people ? It doesnt matter how common or rare those cases are , it still happens. It almost killed me 25 years ago and I am still living with the painful and debilitating consequences. This happened despite the fact that I already had it as a child ! Some people still believe that you can only ever get it once , not true for everyone I’m afraid. The consequences for adults are much riskier than for children , my case turned into chickenpox pneumonia . At that time the odds of surviving it were 50/50. I believe they are a bit better now . The subsequent complications that followed also nearly killed me twice . My husband was told to expect the worse three times while I was in intensive care. Our two young daughters didnt get to see their mum for over 7 weeks. This was traumatic for them as my husband was at the hospital so much with me.I spent the summer of 1991 in hospital, one of the doctors caught chickenpox off me ! When I left hospital I was in a wheelchair with oxygen tanks waiting for me at home. Do I think ending this disease is important ? What do you think ? Please get your facts straight before making statements about this illness.

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  49. While it is true that this type of severe reaction is rare – what the author fails to point out is that a long term concern with chicken pox is it manifesting itself as shingles in the future. Shingles is incredibly painful and with older adults can be extremely debilitating and intractable. Speaking from personal experience it is not an something I would like to repeat. Yes as a young child I had chicken pox with no complications – I never expected to experience shingles in my 30’s!

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  50. The article made it clear that secondary infections were the cause of the extreme sores and scabbing. Babies will naturally rub and scratch at itches. Special cloth should be used for wrapping both hands to prevent this. I did notice one photo shows one hand wrapped.
    However, throughout the article, scratching and secondary infection was not blamed. It was all about parents failure to get children vaccinated.
    Also, as mentioned, treatment such as Ibuprofen was not mentioned, yet it appears that was a possibility. It seems the mother either wasn’t aware — which seems unlikely since the person providing her daughter the vaccine would have provided the warning — was inattentive, or is unwilling to accept any blame.

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  51. If the vaccines don’t work why haven’t any of my kids gotten chicken pox? No one in their daycare or school get chicken pox either. Both my brother and I got chicken pox as kids. None of us have been vaccinated for chicken pox.

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  52. My children had chicken pox twice each. No complications although my son was 14 when he got the second round of it. I got shingles – although I had no pox with my chicken pox and only one pox with shingles. Very painful and it’s not true that you only get shingles once. You can get it more than once. (I did). I still have residual pain – but honestly, I don’t remember if I or my kids were vaccinated.

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  53. Having grown up prior to the chickenpox vaccine I can attest to the fact that yes chickenpox can be dangerous. My brother got the chickenpox and infected my sister, age 9 months, and my mother, age 37. My mother almost died from them and had to spend time in the hospital. Until you have seen first hand how badly they can affect young babies and adults don’t tell people they aren’t dangerous or make suppositions as to what they did to become so sick. Have you had them, probably no, because the vaccine was in use and the incidents of chickenpox was very small. Well I have and I can tell you first hand how SCARY it is when you are 8 years old to see your school class half empty and you are just waiting for your turn to get them. If you don’t want to vaccinate your child you have that right but you don’t have the right to have your child infect unsuspecting others. No vaccine, then keep them confined to your home. I seriously doubt that you will publish this

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  54. Thanks for the article. It’s excellent. I grew up with Chickenpox being something that everyone got and the sooner we could get it over and done with the better, and we’d then be immune for life. I came from a large family and we went to a large school. Chickenpox parties happened frequently. In all those years I never once knew of anyone having a severe reaction to chickenpox. It was like having a common flu, but with itch. Our older two kids got chicken pox from their friends and we were glad to get that over and done with and to know that they were immune for life, and glad that we had had it when we were young and were immune as a result. Our younger two are now in their teens and have not had a chance to be exposed because everyone is vaccinating these days. Too bad that they may well have to deal with it when they are older, when it will not be so easy for them. Do you know how long vaccines provide immunity as adults, or how often they would need to be vaccinated, if they decided to do so?

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  55. Awesome article! I’m so tired of getting looked down on for not vaccination my kids. I wish people would study for themselves instead of trusting totally in doctors.

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  56. I can’t even read your entire article. The headline alone is offensive. I am thrilled that you haven’t watched your child suffer with chicken pox. Aaron was a healthy 3year old on 1994 when he got chicken pox. He was dead in 21 days and suffered the entire time. He had 3 surgeries, pox everywhere, couldn’t eat, swallow, or cry. Tell me, that isn’t dangerous? Tell me, you wouldn’t be scared? You say that we shouldn’t scare people into getting the vaccine. You are scaring people into not getting the vaccine. Are you even in the medical field? I am not, but I buried my son and saw first hand what chicken pox can do. It might be rare, but what if it was your child? Would the odds matter to you then? My husband got the chicken pox from Aaron and was fine. My younger boys both got the Varicella Vaccine and booster and are fine. Unvaccinated children are putting others at risk.

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I’m Kate, mama to 5 and wife to Ben.  I love meeting new people and hearing their stories.  I’m also a big fan of “fancy” drinks (anything but plain water counts as ‘fancy’ in my world!) and I can’t stop myself from DIY-ing everything.  I sure hope you’ll stick around so I can get to know you better!

Meet My Family
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