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Placenta Tincture: How-To Guide

admin June 26, 2015

A couple days ago, I shared how to encapsulate your placenta.  Many women these days are opting to do so, and are experiencing great benefits from it.  Click over for a summary of those benefits if you’re curious — I won’t rehash them here.  Time to discuss placenta tincture!

I didn’t even know this was a “thing” when my fourth baby was born.  In fact, I didn’t hear about it until a few months before my fifth was born.  This time, I chose to do both capsules and tincture.

Why Choose Capsules?

Capsules of dried placenta have distinct advantages.

  • Ready in hours
  • Easy to take/no flavor
  • Easy to make/little special equipment

Why Choose Tincture?

Tincture has distinct advantages, too.

  • Extremely potent (1 drop = 1 capsule)
  • Shelf-stable
  • Long lasting
  • No special equipment

I choose both.  Capsules are needed right away, but tincture means the benefits last longer. I was able to use my placenta to make about 75 capsules (average is 100 – 150 from a whole placenta) plus 8 oz. of tincture.  That’s quite a lot of benefit!

How to Make Placenta Tincture

This really could not be easier.  It took me all of three minutes to do the final steps of this.  (Probably took my husband an additional 5 – 10 minutes to do the first step.)

You will need:

  • Placenta
  • 100-proof vodka
  • A glass jar with lid (mine was 8 oz.)

Step 1: First, admire the placenta that nourished your baby for nine months.  How amazing is that?!

placenta tincture

Step 2: Rinse the placenta and remove the cord and membranes.

Step 3: Cut off a chunk of the placenta.  You can do this fresh, or dried.  My husband (who was nice enough to prepare this for me) forgot to do it fresh, so I did it from dried.

placenta tincture

The jar is about 1/4 full.  I would have done closer to 1/2 if it were fresh.

Step 4: Pour vodka over the placenta to fill the jar.

placenta tincture

Add the lid, shake, and store in a cool, dark place for 6 weeks.

After this, strain it out.  Discard the placenta and keep the liquid, ideally in a dark brown glass bottle.

Remember that 1 drop = 1 capsule of dried placenta so it’s very potent.  Take as needed.

Have you ever made placenta tincture?  Did it help you?

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26 Comments

  1. Can I use 80 proof vodka instead of 100 proof? Will it affect the tincture outcome?

    Reply

    • I’m a studying herbalist. With herbs, 80 to 100 proof is acceptable to make a tincture. Alcohol is the solvent that breaks down the material and draws out its medicinal properties. I would assume the same holds true with placenta and that 80 proof is fine. Especially if you’re allowing it to set for a full six weeks. Another thing that is done with herbal tinctures that I would do with placenta is agitation during the setting period. That is to say, you gently shake or tip the jar each day.

      Reply

  2. Hello!! I have 151 proof everclear.. And a pint sized jar and a few chunks of placenta.. Is that enough or is there a specific ratio to keep it from spoiling =)? Thanks! – Zez

    Reply

  3. Can you not strain out the placenta?

    Reply

  4. yes I had my placenta made into tincture and capsules. I took the capsules postnatal for a weeks then kept forgetting and still have those. I used the tincture for hormonal headaches and just super hormonal days. It is incredible, I honestly think there is a chance that I added getting more tincture to the list of reasons to have another. ;-)The most amazing thing I have used the tincture for is during my current pregnancy for hormone craziness esp the effects of milk supply for and for relief from my nursing aversion with baby number 2 that I am tandem nursing (I think this counts as tandem nursing)while I am preg w/ number 3. The discomfort and irritability was mindblowing. I had terrible nipple pain and almost non existant milk that baby #2 kept saying was yucky (researched and found this was from the progesterone. My supply went up a little and the taste does not seem to warrant complaints anymore but mostly the terrible discomfort and just irritable yucky, nails on a chalkboard feeling has improved greatly. Still a little of all of those but not all the time and again, just a little.

    Reply

  5. Hi there, I’m just wondering if you could tell me roughly how many capsules (00) I should break open in order to make a tincture? I have some left over that I’d like to turn into a tincture for later. Thanks in advance.

    Reply

  6. How big is the jar?

    Reply

  7. The link to the placenta encapsulation isn’t working. Is there another place I can find that entry? Also, based on the directions you provided, how many servings would that yield?

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  8. My tincture was ready the same time my capsules were. Does that mean the tincture is a dud since it only steeped for 1 day? Everywhere I read states steeping should be a minimum of 6 weeks. Does it make it unsafe for the baby since it probably is mostly alcohol?

    Reply

  9. I encapsulated my placenta and unfortunately did not save any to make a tincture. I do however have the dried umbilical cord. Does anyone know if I can use that to make a tinc tincture?

    Reply

  10. […] If you prefer, you can also make a placenta tincture. […]

    Reply

  11. What ate different ways to use the tincture? I was told I could rub a drop on the bottom of my baby’s feet. What are the benefits of that, and can i do that for myself too? How would I use this to help with hormonal headaches….just under the tongue?
    Thanks!

    Reply

    • Hi Tiffiny!

      I would not use it on baby, because it’s supposed to help you to heal and balance hormones after birth. Most recommend starting with 5 – 6 drops per day shortly after birth, and slowly backing off to 1 – 2 drops, then none. It helps your hormones to recover more slowly so they don’t just crash. You can also use it later for PMS, PPD, anxiety, and much later — menopause.

      Reply

  12. Can I leave the bits of placenta in the jar? Potentially to later make a new batch of tincture? Can I add drops to any beverage?

    Reply

    • Hi Vinnie!

      Yes, you can leave the placenta in the jar. If you add more alcohol, the later tincture would not be as strong. Yes, you could add the drops to any beverage.

      Reply

  13. What if my tincture has been sitting for way longer than 6 weeks, more like 16 weeks, aghhhh. I hope it’s still ok!

    Reply

  14. I didnt rinse my wife’s placenta before cutting off a piece and placing it into a jar (was still pretty bloody) is that OK or should I prepare another tincture?

    Reply

  15. I feel stupid asking this but…I made a tincture after my son’s birth 13 months ago. It’s been sitting in the cabinet and I haven’t strained it yet! I kept forgetting/putting it off. It will be really strong by now I suppose. Should I even bother to strain after all this time or just throw it away?

    Reply

    • Please don’t throw it away. Some people never strain! It’s golden!

      Reply

      • Thank you for answering that question! I’ve had mine sitting for almost 2 years without straining. Glad to know it’s still okay. Need it for my post weaning depression…. when she finally decides to wean.

        Reply

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I’m Kate, mama to 5 and wife to Ben.  I love meeting new people and hearing their stories.  I’m also a big fan of “fancy” drinks (anything but plain water counts as ‘fancy’ in my world!) and I can’t stop myself from DIY-ing everything.  I sure hope you’ll stick around so I can get to know you better!

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