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More Proof That the “Vaccine Pusher” Crowd Can’t Think Critically….

admin January 24, 2014

vaccine

 

Image by USACE European District

Maybe that title is mean.  But I’m angry.

(For the record — “pro-vaccine” means “pushes vaccines on everyone and thinks people shouldn’t have a choice” not “thinks vaccines are the right choice for their family and believes ‘to each his own.'”)

I truly have nothing but contempt for this movement, who think they can limit others’ freedom because of their personal belief in vaccines.  This latest bit of news shows pretty clearly how they can’t think critically, and therefore shouldn’t be allowed to make decisions for anyone else (not that they should anyway).

The pro-vaccine logic goes a little bit like this:

Vaccinate everyone as much as possible! … Some people opt out … People are getting sick because we don’t vaccinate enough! … Vaccine rates go up, more people get sick …  Blame the unvaccinated!  They’re not listening to us!!

There are some disease outbreaks now (mostly whooping cough).  But there’s also evidence of mutating strains and vaccine failure.  They refuse to consider this evidence, pretend it doesn’t exist, and scream louder at the unvaccinated crowd.  That’s just brilliant.  And then this happened….

The Map

The Council of Foreign Relations has been tracking outbreaks of vaccine-preventable disease since 2008.  They’ve created an interactive map, showing which diseases are having outbreaks and where.  Each disease has its own color, and appears in the area where it occurred.  The size of the circle relates to how many cases there were (and if you hover over the circle, it will tell you exactly how many cases).

This is actually really neat, and there’s a lot we could learn from it.  Assuming, that is, we engage our brains and use critical thinking skills.

In the U.S., the single most common disease was whooping cough.  Why?

Overall, the kindergarteners entering in the fall of 2013 had over 95% DTaP completion rate (varying from 83 – 99.9% depending on state).  We’re at the level that supposedly provides “herd immunity” but a lot of people are getting pertussis anyway.  And if you look at the map, some states with very high vaccination coverage had major outbreaks.

Plus if you look at the CDC’s historical data, in 1997 the coverage rate for four doses of DTP was just 81%!  That means in the last 25(ish) years, coverage has significantly increased yet so have the cases of pertussis.  (There were 6,564 cases of pertussis in 1997, or about 2.7 per 100,000 people.  In 2012, there were 47,277 cases, or 15.4 per 100,000 people.)

This would suggest that it’s not childhood vaccination rates that are causing the pertussis outbreak.  To anyone with any critical thinking skills, something else is going on.  But oh no — they have to blame those “anti-vaccine parents” anyway.  It’s easier to lead the witch hunt if you can scare people with misrepresented data….

But more importantly, what is going on?  There are a few possibilities:

  • Adult Tdap rates are low and they are spreading pertussis, possibly unknowingly (it’s often minor in adults)
  • The vaccine is failing, and people who are vaccinated are getting pertussis anyway
  • Pertussis is mutating, and the strain circulating isn’t covered by the vaccine

Let’s explore those a little more.

Adult Tdap Rates Are Low

About a year ago, the Annals of Internal Medicine announced an adult vaccination schedule for the first time.  This includes 1 dose of Tdap, or a dose for women with each pregnancy.  Since the schedule is brand new, vaccination rates are likely to be lower.  The CDC also doesn’t have a very accurate count on who has received a Tdap vs. Td (just tetanus).  It’s estimated that around 60% of adults have received some form of tetanus-containing vaccine, which may or may not have contained the pertussis element.  

Despite the uncertain numbers, it’s likely that adult coverage is fairly low (although getting higher, since the new recommendations have come out).  We know that the vaccine lasts for around 5 (or up to 12) years, so adult rates being low could be a factor in pertussis spreading.

(However, “protection” is estimated based on antibody levels, but antibody levels don’t correlate well with protection against pertussis.)

The Vaccine is Failing

We’re told that pertussis rates “must” be high because so many people aren’t vaccinating.  But what does the actual data say?

According to the CDC, the vast majority of people who are getting pertussis were fully vaccinated.  According to this data, 59% had 3 or more doses of DTaP.  Just 9% were completely unvaccinated.  In fact, a full 73% had had at least one dose of DTaP!

Which leads me to the last point….

Pertussis Strains Circulating Aren’t Covered by the Vaccine

There are two main forms of pertussis: pertussis, and parapertussis.  It is theorized that parapertussis is responsible for many of the cases that we’re seeing now.  In fact, this study from Penn State shows that getting a DTaP vaccine actually increases the colonization of parapertussis, making infection more likely!

This study shows that when vaccine coverage increases, so do rates of parapertussis.

How Do We Protect Infants?

Ultimately, any or all of these things could be a factor in why pertussis cases are increasing.  What’s not a factor is “parents who don’t vaccinate.”  That’s far too simplistic, and basically disproven by point #2 above, as well as the overall increase in vaccination coverage over the last 15 – 20 years.

But the real question we should be asking isn’t “whose fault is this,” but “how do we protect young infants?”

That’s something that we should be asking, because young babies are at risk.  This is despite high vaccination coverage.  We could look at all the data available to us and decide what the best option is.  Some will say vaccines (the “cocooning” that is being suggested — all adults in contact with newborns should receive Tdap) and others will say something else.

I would suggest breastfeeding, babywearing, keeping new babies out of public places where possible, especially in the first month or two.  I would suggest adults acquire natural immunity to pertussis if at all possible, because they will pass this to their newborns!

Regardless — there’s a lot to learn here.  There’s a lot to be discussed.  It’s a good conversation to have.

And yet, people are too busy focusing on the overly simplistic (and incorrect) conclusion of, “It’s those unvaccinated peoples’ fault.  We need to blame them and shame them some more, and try to scare them into vaccinating.”

I have had enough of that.

Stop trying to scare or shame people.  Start asking the tough questions and having a little scientific curiosity.  Start having honest discussions and respecting peoples’ input.  Because these latest scare tactics lead me to believe that the people using them simply aren’t capable of this level of critical thinking.  They aren’t capable of looking at actual data, or history, and drawing interesting and complex conclusions.  No, they’ve made up their minds that everything is “those darn non-vaccinating parents’ fault” and they’re not open to evidence that might suggest something different.

Parents on the fence, ask more questions.  Demand more answers.  Don’t believe everything you read.  (Including here — all my sources are linked, so feel free to read them for yourself.)  Maybe then we can have a respectful discussion on an important topic, without the fear.

What do you think about the latest scare tactics?

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  1. Amen, sister. This stuff is getting old. I was shaking I was so angry after I saw a friend post this and I read it. And just saddened by a nurse’s response to my friend that it was a “great article” and her applauding the doctors who drop their patients for not vaccinating to teach the parents a lesson until they “wisen up”. Thanks for posting a great response. I’d be curious to know the vaccination rates in the countries with no dots (parts of South America, Northern Africa, and a few middle eastern countries from what I could see) or if they just don’t report them?

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  2. Fear tactics are generally how this country operates. Instill fear in as many people as possible, in order to control their thinking and decisions. After that, just keep feeding them talking points, false or not, and the message will spread, the truth will get lost in the shuffle, and before long there won’t be many asking questions. If questions are asked, points are raised, then put more talking points out there.

    Unfortunately, this is true, whether on the topic of vaccinations or not. Quite simply, if you ask me, you’ve hit the nail on the head. Let’s all ask questions, listen to others, and be open to seeing/hearing information that might differ from our thoughts/ideas/opinions. 🙂

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  3. So if I’m reading this right, you’re upset that people are being asked to vaccinate against things that are either mutating or have low vaccination rates in adults. How do you explain away the measles outbreaks? What exactly is your scientific evidence for not vaccinating children?

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  4. Good article you have written. But the thing I am fearful of, you only just touched on. ” I would suggest breastfeeding, babywearing, keeping new babies out of public places where possible, especially in the first month or two.” So what do you do if you have more than one kid, and your kindergarten age kid brings it home. There is no amount of baby wearing that will protect you. And what if you couldn’t breastfeed, or you have adopted a newborn, what do you do to protect baby? I know vaccinating isn’t the answer if vaccinated people are getting it. But I also wonder if unvaccinated people aren’t getting it to the same rate as vaccinated, because there is a trend here where I live, that all goes together, and it looks like this:
    Non-vaccinating/ Wholefood/ Organic eating/ HOMESCHOOLER. And it is the vast numbers of non-vaccinating parents are homeschooling, therefore diminishing their exposure. I am sure some non-vax parents send their kids to school, and some vax parents keep their kids home. But I am just telling you what the majority is here. What do you think? And if you can’t breastfeed, how can you improve the immune system of your baby? So if they do get whooping cough, It won’t kill them?

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  5. thank you for this great post! I was so irritated when I saw a friend post this and when I made a comment another friend of hers (very pro vaccines) went crazy. He started just cussing and calling me a moron to telling me that I should go kill myself. I know he clearly got off the topic, all I was trying to do was have a real conversation about it.

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  6. You mentioned adults creating a natural immunity to Pertussis, how would you go about doing that? Is it something we can do with most of the diseases? I’m still nursing my one year old, and I’d like to give her as much immunity as possible since my husband and I are still researching vaccines and diseases, and we haven’t made up our minds completely yet. I’m excited to read more of your articles!

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  7. Well done!
    Thank-you. I will be sharing this.

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  8. Thanks for the well-cites post! I am wondering about the cocooning method of preventing pertussis in infants. Could you discuss the potential benefits and drawbacks of a family exposing themselves to para pertussis (either via vaccine or some other way) before a baby is born or conceived? Would that help protect a breast feeding infant via mommas antibodies?

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  9. You’re the one who has troubles with critical thinking skills. The posted article is quite illogical. For example, “I truly have nothing but contempt for this movement, who think they can limit others’ freedom because of their personal belief in vaccines.” That’s an embarassingly obvious straw man. The people who think that people should be required to have vaccines don’t think this “because of their personal belief in vaccines”. They think this because of the hard, incontrovertible, scientific evidence that vaccines prevent serious outbreaks of deadly diseases. This person thinks that she can argue against this evidence by claiming that it is just a matter of personal belief. That’s like someone trying to escape my telling them about the Gospel by saying that that is just my personal belief. In short, it’s a pathetic, straw man argument. Being a straw man argument, it’s illogical. The straw man fallacy is one of the most basic logical fallacies.

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  10. Thank you for writing this rebuttal to that info-graphic! I simply have not had the time to contest it in my own webpage. Your links and writing squashed it!!! I have placed a link to your webpage on “Blogs I Love” page, and I will also link to this rebuttal and store it in my blog for reference. What a treat it is to come across your work. You have a ton of great information not just regarding vaccines!

    Blessings,

    Heather
    autismrawdata.net

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  11. I am an RN and have done countless hours of research on vaccines. I am also a mother of 4, ages 16, 12, 14mo and 2wks. My two eldest ( both girls) were vaxed on schedule and my two youngest (both boys) are vax free. The girls were always coming down with something and they always got it after a round of shots. I never questioned the shots. Not even for #2 who got a rare madtpiditis infection after the MMR at 12mo. #1 ended up with ear tubes and adenoids removed at age 5 due to recurring ear infections.

    As they got older I started to read a lot more about vax injury and after talking with their doctor, we agreeed to stop shots. He almost seemed relieved that I had come to this decision. I love that man for his ethics and for not being a pharma shill. He always sent me to natural remedies before pushing pharm.

    Then I went to nursing school and really dove into research on pharma. Oh my word. The unethical stuff I found was just too much and it wasn’t just vax. In 2011 I took a position of running shot clinics for a major corporation. The documentation I had to read was beyond mind numbing. I do not believe that the other nurses doing the clinics read itcall and I know doctors do not. In the manuals it clearly stated that vax do not work. We were giving a year old formula that year, mostly due to surplus! The industry is so full of contradictions that it is no wonder people get so confused.

    I now have my boys and they are vax free. Neither has had any illness outside of #3 having measles at 10.5mo. It was very short and cleared in 7 days and outside of the fever that I let burn he was not miserable. Now I have had some serious vax pushers give me hell saying it could have been prevented if I had vaxed. First of all, the MMR is not given until 12 or 15 mo. So there goes that argument. And the only person we were around was a child who had just gotten that shot. So I am going to suspect shedding as our route of infection. But since he was so healthy from not fighting other infections from shots that usually are given a birth and 2wks, 2, 4 and 6 mo…his immune system fought it off fast. And now he has natural immunity. Being educated on how to recognize and treat these childhood diseases is far more beneficial than any shots. If he had taken a bad turn I would have taken him in. That is the only reason I feel we need a doctor. Otherwise we stay out of his office.

    Vaccines are based on the flawed science of Pasteur who admitted that his theory was junk. Unfortunately our whole medical model is based upon it. Pasteurization was the worst thing we could have done to dairy as it has made it toxic to our bodies. And people wonder why we are chronically ill. We must shift to the pleomorphism model vs monomorphism and return to goo health. And until we reach critical mass, I will be a vax critic and do what I can to get people to see the double speak for themselves.

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  12. good article. if people are getting parapertussis, then what percent of the 59% (that had 3 or more DTaP vaxs) actually had pertussis/parapertussis. if none had pertussis, then i would wonder: Did the vaccine work against pertussis? also, the 9% that were unvax’d, did they have parapertussis or pertussis?

    Maybe we don’t know the answer…

    also, regarding breastfeeding, some mamas do not produce enough (due to insufficient glandular tissue), so it is difficult for their babies to receive immunities from their mama… and their are not enough milk donors out there. should one vax then?

    signed,
    on-the-fence

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  13. Thank you for addressing this issue. I do not see the original article or graphic, but it may be because I’m on mobile. Seems the more I read, the more fallacies I see with vaccines. I’m so thankful that we decided to wait with my daughter until we were sure. We’re sure of our decision now. My next project is to compile all the vaccine info I have into one binder. Website articles, etc, that way it’s in one place and I don’t have to worry about losing the info if I don’t have internet.

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  14. Couldn’t agree more! Great writing. You might be interested in yet another thing the CDC got completely wrong. http://regardingparents.wordpress.com/2013/04/19/lay-that-baby-down-on-his-tummy/

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  15. I just fell in love a little bit. Thank you so much for a clear, well written, respectful and evidence based (with some logic thought) point of view. Vaccines have been a passion of mine ever since I got my DC. I’m burning out, arguing with people who just want to point fingers (from both sides). We need to come together and start thinking more objectively and critically, and see if we can find out what’s really going on. This was really a pleasure to read.

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  16. Hi! A question about your opinion on a matter…

    I’m currently 3 months pregnant (first time mom) and know I will probably be faced with the choice of getting the pertussis vaccine, so I’m trying to consider very carefully. Doing some careful research about vaccine ingredients and safety for TDap is on my to do list, but I haven’t done this yet. I’m generally wary of but not necessarily against vaccines. I think in general we are over-vaccinated, but I can also see the benefit of some vaccines in some cases. I’ve chosen not to get a flu vaccine during pregnancy because I’m in good health, very rarely get sick (and when so, only with minor colds), and therefore I couldn’t justify the possible risk of the flu vaccine to my developing, first trimester baby. However, as far as pertussis goes, I’m wondering your opinion on if the possible vaccine benefits would outweigh the risks. I do plan to breastfeed, babywear, etc., but I don’t know if I could live with myself if my baby got whooping cough as a newborn and had complications, or worse. Do you think there are any significant risks to me (or baby) in getting a pertussis vaccine as a healthy adult (eating a real food diet, strong immune system, etc)? I know it does not have mercury, so that’s good at least. I’m not sure if I articulated my concerns well, but I guess basically I’m asking about risk/benefits of getting the TDap vaccine in late pregnancy.

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  17. Thank you so much for a thoughtful post. It’s unfortunately a rarity in the pro-vax/anti-vax world as people seem to have taken a hard stance in many ashes without doing any research. For me, one of the most insufferable arguments on this subject is the one with a person who is regurgitating information that they learned in a commercial, from a doctor, or just about anywhere without actually seeking out the real sources of the data. At first, I thought that by digging some holes in those common statements that I could point others to the sources, not to change their minds, but to create an understanding between us when they realized that the very data they were citing (CDC, etc) was where I made my case.

    Instead, they refuse to even look and will only yell louder and demand that I stop discussing my vaccine stance. I’m a statistician; to me, numbers speak, and they’re pretty convincing to a person looking for logic. I will not stop discussing when I hear a person being lied to and told their child will not be able to go to school; I’ll shine a light on the truth and help them find their state’s exemption language.

    If it’s an epidemiologist or another scientist who works with infectious diseases for a living, sure, go ahead and yell. Otherwise, the secondhand bits of rant are just obnoxious bullying.

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  18. Paraphrasing but essentially your point about more people who are vaccinated getting a disease than those unvaccinated does not prove unvacinnation is better. Bayes theorem essentially. You seem a smart person and cite poor use of statistics but then use the most famous flawed intuitive reasoning that breaks actual statistics.

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  19. In my comment above I should have used “probability” instead of “statistics” but I hope you get the gist

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  20. Thank you Kate for making sense!

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  21. One of the things I love about the vaccine-pushers is their obsession with Jenny McCarthy. Nobody cares about Jenny McCarthy. And yet I challenge you to find a pro-vaccine article that doesn’t mention her as the leader of the “anti-vaccine movement.” As if a former Playboy model would have that kind of influence. The only people she has influenced are the vaccine-pushing lemmings who can’t recognize a big-boobed straw-man when they see one.

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  22. Thank you so much for a well researched, logical article that expresses a lot of my own frustrations, and those of many other parents who question the safety of vaccination. A number of great studies in there to add to my collection too. Keep up the great work!

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  23. Your numbers are wrong! You compared 2013 kindergartners to 1997’s 35 month olds! The 5-6 year olds have been vaccinated at over 95% since 1980 according to the link you posted. So the percentage of kindergartners vaccinated would be about the same and the diseases are on the rise.

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  24. Great article. I was wondering if you could speak to the fact that Andrew Wakefield, the guy that “proved” a link between vaccines and autism, confessed to making it up? He confessed to fraudulent “research” on a pretend link between the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine, and the appearance of autism and bowel disease. It’s one thing to oppose vaccines for real reasons, but another out of a fear that was caused by a man who intended to profit from that fear.

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  25. The same people who blame nonvaccination are the same people who never question big pharma. To them the pharmacuetical-medical complex can do no wrong.

    I found it interesting on the statistics that diseases are happening despite vaccines.

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  26. Katie,

    I wonder if you’ve seen this article. My son sent it to me cause he knows that I question vaccines. It is just scare tactics just like you are writing about.

    http://touch.latimes.com/#section/-1/article/p2p-78971408/

    keep up the good work!

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  27. Vaccines are plain old bad medicine. The harm vaccines cause, gardasil for instance, is responded to with mind numbing contempt
    similar to the famous Monty Python “Argument” skit.

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  28. Hello,
    I have never been pushed into vaccinating my children. However, I have been bombarded with anti-vaccine scare tactics. I do like your site so far it appears to be more open minded and logical. I firmly believe that if there be an ill side affect there is a least one other factor involved-environment, hereditary, I used to say an unknown factor but now I have something I hadn’t thought of- a new strain of the virus. However, for the most part when I say I’m for most vaccines I’m accused as being a dumb sheep who believes everything the govt tells me to believe. I did share the map you refer to above but only as a tool to show that people still get these diseases because I was told by anti-vaccine believers that they weren’t a threat-that is a matter of opinion. Talking to them is liking talking in a circle-vaccines are bad because of a bunch of silly reasons that are repeated over and over. If I see the term “Big pharma” on here I will run screaming in another direction. Promoting “product” knowledge and looking at info from all angles I am all for.

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  29. blaming the unvaccinated for disease outbreaks is like blaming the poor for the economy. Both make a lot of sense to those lacking critical thinking.
    I saw this map the other day and the first thing that jumped out at me was that North America seems to be the only place having issues with whooping cough. I must believe either the other places aren’t bothering to report it, or the vaccine is fueling the spread of it.

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  30. I am totally against so many vaccines for the young before they are even 5.
    I do wish a study was conducted on the effectiveness of the vaccinated for the flu and the non-vaccinated–how many flu victims were vaccinated??
    Would LOVE to see those numbers.
    Never gonna happen.
    Just ask in the hospital or doc’s office IF they did or not!

    I did read data from one hospital–the numbers confirmed my stance against flu vaccine, for a huge percentage were vaccinated.

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  31. You mentioned some ugly truth here and I am totally agree with you. Fancy medical study, data, statistics makes us docto- hypnotized!

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  32. Do you really think it is a matter of freedom to be pro-vaccine? To be part of a community or society you have the responsibility to promote the welfare of everyone in that collective, and not just selfishly for those you care about. The only freedom that promotion of vaccines infringes upon is to be selfish and to endanger others. “Pushing” vaccines onto others implies that vaccines are needlessly dangerous, something that anti-vaccers just haven’t proven. If you don’t want to vaccinate your children, then you can choose to live outside of society. That is freedom.

    If you want to live within society, then you must abide by the collective rules and laws, otherwise prove those rules are wrong, and convince others with evidence. Opinions, emotions and intuition are not evidence. But again, anti-vaccers haven’t proven, without resorting to logical fallacies, fear-mongering tactics and conspiracy theories to prove that vaccines are needlessly dangerous. Nor have they attempted to submit to peer-reviewed medical journals and gone through the proper scientific methods to prove their claims. Why is that? Why wouldn’t someone want to prove with solid, peer-reviewed, and testable evidence that their claims are real? Perhaps because they know deep down that their position is untenable? That all they have are appeals to the emotions of parents and fear-mongering to make them think that vaccines are risky? It is quite easy to throw ad hominems and claim doctors and drug companies are conspiring against the world to make money by risking the health of others. But don’t the thousands upon thousands of people “in the know” also have family themselves? Why wouldn’t one company undermine another company by proving their vaccine is garbage? Why wouldn’t someone who cares about their children blow the whistle? Or a greedy ex-employee blow the whistle for perfectly selfish reasons?

    As for critical thinking, the failure to recognize and avoid your own logical fallacies is evident. First, conflating or misrepresenting the pro-vaccination position is to create a strawman, reductio ad absurdum. If you cannot present their side honestly, then that is a good reason to examine why you want to misrepresent others. Also, stating that vaccine rates go up, more people get sick is a just simply a statement that doesn’t hold up to scrutiny and you have given no evidence to support this statement. If you think presenting links to other people’s books in Amazon proves your statements, then you are resorting to argumentum ad populum. If you want people to listen to you, then make arguments that are backed up by facts, evidence that are supported with research, science and provable, testable data.

    Do you think that mutating strains are caused by the use of vaccines themselves? Again, where are the peer-reviewed studies that support these claims? Claims are not evidence. Even if you were to prove that a higher number of vaccinations correlate to higher number of virus outbreaks, correlation is not causation. In regards to this vaccine-preventable outbreak map, what would be useful is the reasons why there was a 12,000 case outbreak of Whooping Cough in Arizona in November 2013. Who were these people? What was a common factor? What made them reject vaccinations in the first place? Was this promoted by anti-vaccination propaganda? Political? Religious?

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  33. Unvaccinated adults can not be a contributor to the increase in pertussis cases, since until recently adults were never vaccinated for it and the rates were far lower. The recent baboon study could actually lead to the conclusion that vaccinating adults for pertussis may be contributing to the rise, though. It would explain why “cocooning” was such an abysmal failure that the Australian government stopped covering/promoting it.

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  34. Good article, Kate. Interesting comments, too.
    One question with this part of your article:
    ” I would suggest adults acquire natural immunity to pertussis if at all possible, because they will pass this to their newborns! ”
    I actually had pertussis when I was 13yo (don’t know how I got it, since I was homeschooled). The dr. told us that it was common for teens to get it, because the vaccine wears off. =P Anyway, I am now 31yo and have 3+ children born 2008, ’10, ’12, and this year (Lord willing). All the children have been breastfed to at least a year. Now, from what you wrote, does that mean that my children have a natural immunity because I had the disease? Or, would that immunity only be during the time they are breastfed or right after birth? Or, does it not matter since it’s been so long since I had pertussis?
    Sorry, there are more questions than just one. 🙂 I just found this website and am enjoying the articles. Thanks for being “different”! (Makes me feel less weird! lol)

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  35. Great article Kate. Have you ever considered using homeopathic remedies or homeoprophylaxis? It is a safe way to get good immunity to disease, using individual remedies for disease. If you have a look at Dr Isaac Goldens’ website, he does research on immunisation, and has facts and stats to confirm how effective the homeopathic remedies are.
    http://www.homstudy.net

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  36. I JUST went today to my 24 week checkup for Baby #5 and was told the next time I go in, my midwife told me they now recommend that I get the tdap. Uh… nope. I just don’t like that I have to get the “weird” looks. 🙁 I just want to be armed with a quick, strong response as to WHY I’m not getting it. Thanks for this! I had a booster MMR the day after I had our third child (they told me I HAD to have it, didn’t have a choice) and I have struggled with arthritis ever since and now go to a chiropractor monthly for maintenance just to keep the pain from being overwhelming. That was almost 5 years ago and I am still only 31… with arthritis. (And BTW, my doc didn’t seem concerned that it could be from the MMR so it was never reported. I wonder how many that happens to.) Our 4th child, our only who has had no vax, is absolutely by far our healthiest child.

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  37. I personally did not vaccinate my children until they were older. I am unvaccinated myself, as when my eldest brother was recieveing a vaccination he has a severe and immediate vaccination reaction and was rushed to hospital, where he ended up with encephilitis . Luckily he is fine, but it scared my parents off, and made me cautious about vaccinating my own children at a young age. I think what people need to do if they chose to hold off is USE COMMON SENSE. When my children were babies, no visitors wee allowed to kiss them. Everyone was asked to not visit if they were I’ll. I messaged al my mothers group friends and asked them to let me know if thier children were ill before a catch up, and if they were, even a runny nose, I wouldn’t go. I did the same if MY children were ill so I did not share THIER sickness around. My children did not attend daycare so it made it relatively easy to control exposure to ill people. When they attended 3 year old kinder I made sure they had had the most serious vaccinations, but we did it sloooooowly and not all together as they seem to want to lump them, so we could monitor easily for any reactions and give thier immune systems time to recover before the next assault. AND WE NEVER SHARE DRINKS. I personally am still unvaccinated, although I will be going in for the first round soon. My brothers and myself are honestly extremely healthy, and have very strong immune systems. If we get a illness, its gone in 3 days. Its no big deal. I have to agree for pro immune people to get off the back of non immunizing familys. I HATED having to justify myself every time I explained I was not immunized. Most people want to do what is best for thier individual child. They are doing what they believe is right, and in the best interests of thier familys health. Vaccinating is still a choice, and for a reason – there is the 1% who will have a severe life threatening reaction, and possibly die, as our family has seen. I am pro vaccinating to a extent, but not at such a young age when they do not even have a iota of natural immunity,and loading them up with so many at once seems to me, crazy. Also people seem to feel safe from disease now so may are vaccinated and send thier children off to kinder nearly puking. Disease and sickness is serious, and one Childs immune system may not be as strong as anothers. Keep sick people at home!!!! And stop judging one another, everyone is entitled to thier opinion on this subject.

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  38. Watch Alex Jones at Infowars.com/listen Its a lot deeper than vaccines. http://www.heartcom.org/Vaccines4Terror.htm

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  39. you know, some of you are just plain ignorant! I had EVERY childhood disease, except Rheumatic fever and quite a few of those wonderful childhood diseases, I had more than once. I spent my winters in the hospital. Today, thanks to no vaccines being present at that time, I am deaf. Oh yeah, let a disease have it’s way and ride it out! Don’t bother to consider how hard it is on the child! Do you folks realize how many people had polio before the vaccine came out? When I was growing up I knew a lot of people who had polio, myself included! How many people do you know that had polio?

    Vaccines save lives! Many parents lost their children due to those childhood diseases and would have given anything to have their children vaccinated and here you sit yapping about something you don’t even know about!

    If you don’t believe me, google diseases such as polio, whopping cough, measles, small pox, tb and learn what happens when a person gets these diseases. You don’t hear much about them now, BECAUSE people have to be vaccinated. All of these diseases were and are contagious!

    What some of you folks need, is to have your children come down with something and then tell us how right you were not to have them vaccinated!

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  40. I have started a new blog. Post 1 surveyed the actual scientific literature (not the imaginary one Pediatricians and many others probably including you believe must surely exist) and showed the literature quite clearly indicates that vaccines in the first months of life, especially containing aluminum, are dangerous. Post 2 remarked on how the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies wrote a 270pp survey last year exactly on the question of safety of the vaccine series, and managed to ignore all of the dozens of mainstream journal papers cited and linked in my survey while finding no other cogent papers on the subject (but discussing large numbers of papers on strawman issues, sound familiar?)

    Post 4 points out that the examples of Vaccinism and Global Warmism empirically falsify the mental model almost all of us have of how people such as Pediatricians and Climate Scientists form their opinions. It discusses instead the psychological model of Gustav Le Bon (1895) which explains the observed data much better, including aspects such as the punishing of deniers and the religious intolerance. Le Bon’s book, The Crowd, although not widely cited today, was arguably the text that had the most influence on the shape of the 20th century since it served as a manual for, among others, Teddy Roosevelt, Adolf Hitler, Lenin and Stalin, Mussolini, and Madison Avenue.
    http://whyarethingsthisway.com/2014/03/08/example-1-pediatrician-belief-is-opposite-the-published-scientific-evidence-on-early-vaccine-safety/
    http://whyarethingsthisway.com/

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  41. As a nursing student I watched two babies die of whooping cough – both less than two months old – that they had caught from unvaccinated individuals. In one case that individual was the child’s uncle, whose guilt crushed him.

    The babies coughed themselves to death and choked on their own mucus.

    They are completely vulnerable if the vaccination cannot be given before birth in the small window of time they can inherit the vaccine from their mothers, and have to wait until they are at least six months old before they can be protected.

    This isn’t about personal choice. Or, if it is, whenever I read arguments like yours (which fall horrifically short of the level of knowledge or science expected at any upper-level human physiology course and therefore outside of educated dialogue) all I can think is watching those infants choke to death, their tiny bodies bruised and half-broken from the frantic attempts we made to try to keep them alive… all I an think is that if you want to turn harming the vulnerable members of our population like that into your personal choice… what kind of monster wishes that on an infant? What kind of moral choice is it that you choose to take that risk, that actual factual statistically real risk, for the sake of your… what? ego? fear?

    There is no link between autism and vaccines. At all.

    Even if there was, as someone with autism I am always curious about people like you. Are you really that revolted of me, as someone with autism, that you’d rather risk killing babies and hurting others than risk having a child “like that’?

    I came here interested in budget plans and interesting living suggestions, and found this instead. I won’t ever be visiting this site again and leave a little more sickened at your choices.

    Because, hey, who cares if you kill the children of others if you raise your own perfect child, right? That’s the Christian way apparently…

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  42. Wondering if you have any information or resources for vaccination policies in other countries. We are moving to a place where vaccines are supposedly required by law. We are currently unvaccinated and would like to remain so. Now sure what I can do.

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  43. We actually do know why Pertussis rates keep going up, and have been for over 30 years. The acellular vaccine is simply not that effective. Paul Offit himself comments about this in the link below.

    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/whooping-cough-vaccine-falls-short-of-previous-shots-protection/

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  44. I think you’re right! That’s why my husband and I built a shelter away from the evil medical world because we believe that medicine is horrible for people. we’ve never taken a single pill for anything and we are just fine. Of course we live in a make shift bunker and never let us or our children interact with the outside world. This is the ONLY sure way to keep from getting any diseases and to be unvaccinated. Big brother knows nothing about our lives and one day God will cleanse the world of the non-believers and we can live our lives again around those with like minds such as yourself and your family. After the apocalypse I would love to meet you and your family. We don’t leave the bunker at all, and due to the internet, are able to buy all we need and have it delivered here. After we get our supplies delivered, it is put through a rigorous disinfection process and then it is safe for us. We have been disease and vaccine free since. Thanks again for the fighting good fight!

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  45. Good article. I would say *doesn’t* think critically rather than *can’t.* Be well!

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I’m Kate, mama to 5 and wife to Ben.  I love meeting new people and hearing their stories.  I’m also a big fan of “fancy” drinks (anything but plain water counts as ‘fancy’ in my world!) and I can’t stop myself from DIY-ing everything.  I sure hope you’ll stick around so I can get to know you better!

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